This month’s Center for Women Veterans Book Corner features author is retired combat Army Veteran Ina Johnson Myers, an entrepreneur, radio host, speaker and certified life coach. Myers is the author of “Girl, Don’t Play!!!Pray!!!! The Professional Women’s Guide to Identifying His Brokenness.”

Myers has struggled with PTSD, MST and “narcissistic abuse.” Through her own healing journey, she learned to use her voice with the hope of helping other women identify the mannerisms and traits of narcissistic disorders. She wants other women to not ignore the red flags they see and hear in their search for that perfect partner and cautions that red flags don’t turn green with time.

Cover of Myers' book

Through her own healing journey, Myers learned to use her voice with the hope of helping other women

The following are highlights from her interview with the CWV.

What was your military branch, career field, and years of service?

Army, 94G and 25R, 24 years.

What are you doing now, after leaving service? 

By day, I am a radio host and certified life coach specializing in “narcissistic abuse” awareness, and recovery and victim prevention.

What were your tours, deployments and campaigns (OIF, OEF, Vietnam, Gulf War, etc.)?

I deployed for OIF and to Bosnia.

What notable commendations did you receive (Purple Heart, Bronze Star, Combat Action Ribbon, etc.)?

Army Commendation, Army Achievement, National Defense Service Medal (2), War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, War on Terrorism Service Medal, NATO Medal.

What was your fondest or proudest memory while serving?

My proudest moment was my mother watching me graduate from basic training. My father had just recently died, so he didn’t get to see me graduate.

What was your inspiration for becoming an author, or writing this book?

I had a very significant life experience and I didn’t want other women to think they were alone in their struggle with pain, anxiety and depression.

How has your military experience shaped your creativity or how you express yourself?  

The military helped me see things from a more global and diverse mindset; I see options and possibilities that are always available if I seek them.

What advice would you give other women Veterans who may be considering becoming an author?

The healing of many nations is in your voice. Someone is waiting and needing your experience to heal.

How do you believe that women Veteran authors can be instrumental in shaping society’s understanding of women Veterans’ military experience and their contributions?  

I believe that women Veteran authors are expressive creatures… we paint relatable pictures on a global canvas.

What were some of your obstacles and challenges in writing this book?

Exposing myself to the world through my words and pain.

What are your recommendations for illustrating, book cover selection and the publishing process?

I self-published my book, which wasn’t as hard as I thought, so I recommend self-publishing.

What is one significant thing we should know about you?

I’m the daughter of two WWII Veterans, so resiliency is in my blood.

How has writing this book helped you?

It forced me to evaluate and identify my own issues pertaining to being of service, and to why I chose to be in the relationships I did.

What is your favorite quote?

“I can be changed by what happens to me. But I refuse to be reduced by it.” — Maya Angelou

If you could choose one woman from any point in time to share a meal, who would she be?

My mother Geraldine Lois Johnson. I heard the military stories growing up about her time in service during the 1940’s, but I didn’t pay attention like I wish I would have.

women-centered health care resourcesConnect with fellow women Veterans, learn about available Veteran and women-centered health care resources
Women on the Front Lines bannerVA honors women on the front lines

Share This Story, Choose Your Platform!

You Might Also Be Interested in These Articles