Want to be more involved in your health care? There are many ways to take an active role by working with your health care team to improve your health.

You can play an active role when you meet with your health care team. To get the most out of your visit, plan the questions you want to ask and the things you want to discuss, and be sure to leave the visit with information about your care.

Here are some specific ways to be more involved in your health care and get the most out of your next visit:

Before your visit – During your visit – After your visit

Be involved in your health care: Ask about low blood sugars

Being involved in your health care is especially important in the management of diabetes and hypoglycemia.

What is hypoglycemia?

Hypoglycemia, also called low blood glucose or low blood sugar, occurs when the level of glucose in your blood drops below normal.

A safe blood glucose target range can prevent episodes of low blood sugar.

For many people with diabetes, that means a level of 70 milligrams per deciliter or less. Your numbers might be different, so check with your health care team to find out what level is too low for you.

Low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) | NIDDK (nih.gov)

If you have diabetes, talk with your health care team about selecting a safe and effective blood glucose target range that is based on your own goals, priorities and lifestyle.

Selecting a safe blood glucose target range can help you best manage your diabetes and prevent episodes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Review some of the resources below for more ideas and strategies.

Veterans’ Health Library

The Veterans Health Library offers Veterans, their families and caregivers access to comprehensive health information that’s consistent with VA clinical practice.

Items in the library on Living with Diabetes include:

Videos for Veterans and health care team members on setting an A1c target range:

My HealtheVet blood sugar tracker

If you have a My HealtheVet Premium account, use this blood sugar tracker to monitor your health history and past blood sugar readings.

VA-DoD Clinical Practice Guideline on Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

The VA-DoD Clinical Practice Guideline on Managing Diabetes Mellitus in primary care emphasizes the importance of partnering and sharing decision making between patients and their health care team. This means all aspects of the diabetes care plan – including diet, physical activity, medicines and setting a safe blood glucose target range.

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One Comment

  1. Martins Garrine July 21, 2021 at 7:21 am - Reply

    This is helpful and will keep well informed.
    Thanks a lot

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